Memorial Addresses on Ambrose E. Burnside: A Senator from Rhode Island; In the Senate and House of Representatives; January 23, 1882 (Classic Reprint) books by Forgotten Books

Memorial Addresses on Ambrose E. Burnside: A Senator from Rhode Island; In the Senate and House of Representatives; January 23, 1882 (Classic Reprint) (Rating: 2 - 0 votes)

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PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC Memorial Addresses on Ambrose E. Burnside: A Senator from Rhode Island; In the Senate and House of Representatives; January 23, 1882 (Classic Reprint) books Excerpt from Memorial Addresses on Ambrose E. Burnside: A Senator From Rhode Island; In the Senate and House of Representatives; January 23, 1882 The nation, which was watching, in alternate hope and fear, the ebbing life of its elected chief, turned, for a moment, from the bedside of the dying Garfield, to lament the dead Burnside. In this body, the death of no one among us could have moved the Senate to a profounder sense of sorrow. His bier has been moistened by the tears of a State; his tomb is garlanded by the admiration of a nation. It is not my purpose to enter upon a sketch of the life of General Burnside; scarcely even of his character. The most important part of that life was passed in the service of his country, and his deeds are a part of bis country's history; and so long as New Berne and Roanoke Island, and South Mountain, and Antictam and Knoxvillo are remembered, his services and his fame will not be forgotten. General Burnside was born at Liberty, Union County, Indiana, May 23, 1824. His family was of Scotch descent. His great-grandfather, Robert Burnside, with two brothers, had espoused the cause of Charles Edward, and after the triumph of the British arms, and the overthrow of the Pretender, at Culloden, sought an asylum in South Carolina. The General's grandfather, James Burnside, married a daughter of James Edghill, an Englishman, by birth. His son, the father of the General, bore his mother's paternal name, Edghill Burnside. He was bora in South Carolina, but removed to the Territory of Indiana. He appears to have sympathized with the conscientous repugnance to slavery, which, even at that early day, had been aroused in the Carolines, for he freed his slaves, and accompanied the "Quaker Emigration" to the West, which was dedicated to freedom, by the ordinance of 1787. In his new home, he maintained a character of high respectability and influence; was for a long time, clerk of the county court, an associate justice of the same, and a senator in the Legislature of the State. Ambrose was his youngest son. He gave him a good English education, in the schools of the neighborhood; and in 1843, he entered, as a cadet, at West Point. At the academy, he was not a hard student. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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